/Social, Emotional and Behavioral Supports for Students
Social, Emotional and Behavioral Supports for Students2018-02-14T08:23:23+00:00

SILVER FALLS SCHOOL DISTRICT SUPPORTS FOR STUDENT SUCCESS
PREVENTION, INTERVENTION AND RESPONSE

(This summary does not contain every practice to support the social and emotional needs of students at each school but is a comprehensive summary.)

  • Constant focus on school climate and response to student needs. This includes evaluation of data related to student behavioral, discipline, attendance and other factors. Multiple schools use formal, research-based programs such as Positive Behavioral Intervention Support (PBIS), Tribes, Character Counts and Second Steps. The priority in each building is to provide a safe and welcoming learning environment for each student to feel successful.
  • Problem solving methods and practices with students. These include peer resolution.
  • School Climate programs include bullying, intimidation, threat recognition and response training opportunities for all staff, especially playground supervisors and teachers.
  • Character Counts programs – Monthly respectful and responsible themes.
  • Training of staff members in “Systematic Supervision”.
  • Guidance lessons from teachers and counselors including weekly focus lessons.
  • Social skills groups.
  • Student connection to a positive, caring adult – every day.
  • School assemblies specific to appropriate behaviors and student anti-bullying responses.
  • Use of instructional programs such as “Bully B Ware” and activities during October, National Anti-bullying month.
  • Student mentoring programs.
  • Standardized building expectations communicated through classrooms, assemblies, Advisory Groups and daily expectations.
  • Use of curriculum that addresses the behavioral support of students. The most prominent elementary curriculums in the district include “Second Steps Anti-Violence”, “Steps to Respect” (anti-bullying), and “The Michigan Model” Health Curriculum (drug prevention, anti-bullying, conflict resolution, etc.).
  • Internet safety curriculum and instruction. Includes instruction on Internet etiquette and cyberbullying.
  • Student body meetings and use of support groups such as Link Crew.
  • School-wide focus with an emphasis on cooperative and collaborative learning, empathy, positive character traits, respect and kindness to others.
  • Required background checks for all district volunteers.
  • Annual inservice to principals about laws related to student social/emotional support, anti-bullying and threatening behaviors.
  • Staff meetings used for training purposes.
  • School and district newsletters with safety, behavioral and mental health information.
  • Annual District Safety Awareness Month – October
  • Data driven feedback — safety surveys and use of the Oregon Healthy Teen Survey.
  • Immediate and consistent response to all reports of bullying and threatening behaviors. “No tolerance” is a district-wide attitude.
  • Peer monitoring behaviors with instruction about the necessity to report when it is observed. Focus on themes — “There are no innocent bystanders”, “Safety is not tattling”, “Failure to report is a consequence”.
  • Use of “Options” room and “Respect” room.
  • Use of security staff members.
  • Collaboration with city and county law enforcement agencies including campus presence during the school day, during safety drills, during class presentations and response to school behavioral needs.
  • Student support (CARE) Teams to address student behavioral needs and to develop plans for social-emotional support.
  • Uniform District-wide safety procedures and training.
  • Applied results of district-wide vulnerability assessment including security fencing, improved communication systems and training.
  • District-wide training on Standard Response Protocols (lockdown and lockouts)
  • Use of district School Resource Officer

Higher Level Responses

  • Behavioral CARE Intervention teams.
  • Level I and Level II Threat Assessment Teams and Response.
  • Level I and Level II Suicide Assessment Teams and Response.
  • Level I and Level II Sexual Incident Assessment Teams and Response
  • School discipline systems and behavioral intervention systems, including communication to parents.
  • Required psychological exams, including recommendations for student behavioral plans.
  • Use of Functional Behavioral Assessments
  • School/Building Security systems.
  • Collaboration with mental health specialists, private mental health providers.
  • On-staff district psychologist and behavioral specialists.
  • Suicide prevention and intervention practices.
  • Use of Marion County Health Department Family Support Advocates.

Common prevention, intervention and response supports related to student anxiety, depression and suicide risk

  • Student Anxiety and Depression
  • 504 Plans
  • Group Counseling
  • Individual counseling and individual support plans
  • Family and private provider communication plans
  • 3 Staff trainings on adolescent anxiety
  • Student Education in Health Classes
  • Suicide Risk
  • Staff, student, parent, community referrals
  • Level 1 and 2 risk assessments
  • No harm contracts
  • Student Support Plans
  • Student Education in Health Class
  • 2 Staff QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) trainings through WESD
  • Use of Safe Oregon web site
  • Marion County Youth and Family Crisis Services
  • Secondary Trauma
  • Flight Team (Researched-based model to immediately identify needs and create support plans)
  • Student Support Groups
  • Referrals to Marion County Crisis Services
  • Specialize Advisory Group lessons
  • Ongoing training and support for staff